PPL Quote Of The Day

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PPL Quote Of The Day

Postby Tom » Thu May 18, 2006 10:02 am

From time to time I'll throw in a quote from various band members from articles or personal recollections.

Since Mike never met a microphone or interviewer he didn't like we'll start with him. Besides probably 90% of them will be from him.

In a 1975 Rolling Stone article "Pure Prairie League's Golden Highway" Mike was asked why he and the band were in the business, what did they hope to accomplish etc.

He summed it all up in one sentence: " Man, we just want to be loved. "
Well, it's nice to say 31 years after the article that he got his wish. It may have been the shortest response Mike ever gave.

Take care,
Tom
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Postby Tom » Fri Jun 02, 2006 6:17 pm

Craig Fuller was asked about the fact that he suddenly had a hit song in Amie a few years after he left PPL.

"It was probably weirder for them to have to sing it with me not there," Fuller said about PPL continuing on long after his departure. "It wasn't so bad for me."

Certainly a wild story, the success of Amie.And certainly one with a very happy ending for Craig and PPL.

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Tom
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Postby Tom » Fri Jul 14, 2006 8:40 pm

I had the pleasure of speaking to the pedal steel phenom, Mr. John David Call, prior to a PPL concert. It was just after American Flyer had released their first LP. I asked him what he thought. He didn't hesitate:

I like it, I like it a lot, but if they were smart they would let Craig sing every song like he did with us."

These two Waverly Ohio guys always had a deep respect for each other's talents. A few years later the two would join forces together for one last fling on the Fuller-Kaz band Tour in '78.

All the best,
Tom
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Postby HarryVanderpool » Fri Jul 14, 2006 11:09 pm

What ever became of John Call?
When my wife and I were engaged back in 1979 we went to a PPL concert in Eugene Oregon.
After the show, the band took questions and I asked about him and was told that he dropped out due to back problems.
Where is he now? He was truley great!
Then with my bride to my side i asked, " It really seems like you are moving toward rock and away from country; is that true?"
The band members exploded into laughter and one of them saiid, "Well what does it sound like to you?"
Insulted, I replied, " I love Pure Prairie League. Please don't forget your roots".
Then PPL vanished off of the face of the earth.
Sure is great to hear them once again in their true form, or maybe in an updated form that suits them very well.
Welcome home, PPL!
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Postby Tom » Sat Jul 15, 2006 6:41 am

Hi Harry,

Well won't you be surprised to find out you already know about John. You've been listening to him ! He's doing the steel on the live cut on All In Good Time, the Curtis Wright tune If You Say What I'm Thinking. The song is from a show late last year in Chillicothe Ohio. PPL did two shows and John Call filled in for Fats. George Powell was also there.

For more on John, click on page 3 and look at the thread with his name, it gives a rundown on him. Also, look in the Photo forum, there are some great pics of him playing in a band called 6 Shooter in 79 after leaving PPL. In addition there are some photos of John in the Chillicothe threads. Also look at the thread " 15 sec clip" it's from Chillicothe.

In a nutshell John left PPL with severe back problems, he could no longer tour. John went to school for engineering( a very bright guy) and worked as an electrical engineer. He never stopped playing, and people are still raving about him. He was incredible to say the least, they don't make them any better. One real nice guy too.

PPL actually continued into the mid 80's. Craig returned to PPL then and they recorded Mementos. Again, when you have time, bounce around the various parts of the site. I'm sure you will find a ton of stuff that interests you. And Harry, if you don't have time, well ,just keep asking and you'll get an answer from someone!

Have a good one,
Tom
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Postby Tom » Sat Jul 15, 2006 6:59 am

As long as I'm in this thread here's a quote from Craig just a few weeks ago that I'm sure many will love to hear. He was asked about future recording efforts.

"I hope the audience understands I do not rest on past accomplishments.

"The most important work I am going to do will be in the future."

Now that sounds like very good news right ? What I really love is that this is about as close as it gets to Craig admitting that yes, he just might have a little talent , he just might have something to say ! Every once in awhile, Craig slips ever so slightly and the pride in his work comes shining through. And now we have more to look forward to. I'll put some more info re: this under a new thread.

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Tom
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Postby Tom » Tue Sep 05, 2006 2:34 pm

Back in 1975, Bob Ringe, the producer of PPL's first two LP's was reflecting on the early years. He was asked what the band was like live.

" ...I would say the guys played great live,when they were in the proper situation. They had to fight a lot to get live gigs...when they played like, in Memphis, or Cleveland, places with the right bill and the right audience, they were magical. They really were ! It was great. I used to go on the road with them and they were great ,really. They were good funky musicians and when they got off,...!"

On his first time hearing PPL:

" Their manager...sent me a tape of six songs the band had recorded, a demo tape,and I liked them.I really liked them ! The outstanding song on that tape was a song Craig had written called "You're Between Me..."

On the status of the band when he first met them:

"They had been playing locally with various people. They had been writing. They had been hungry. You know, they had been paying their dues.The usual trip that all musicians go through. Then there was John Call, the steel player, who is one of the finest steel players around...I'm really glad he's back with the band now, because he's great ! I have really fond memories of John..."

All the best,
Tom
Last edited by Tom on Thu Oct 26, 2006 5:13 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Tom » Mon Sep 25, 2006 3:52 am

This one is from Mike Connor, who generally didn't pop up in too many interviews, he just let his music do his talking. He was asked about the personnel changes through the years and the effect on PPL's music, and he certainly had an opinion:

" The important thing is though we keep expanding our musical direction,it still falls into a recognizable pattern. Even though we've had changes in personnel and in musical emphasis, Pue Prairie League still sounds like Pure Prairie League."

I always loved that final summation, PPL still sounds like PPL. In other words, case closed, move on please, next question.

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Tom
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Postby Tom » Thu Oct 26, 2006 5:44 am

In 1975, after the Two Lane Highway LP and the single Amie caught fire and PPL was now rolling along in the spotlight, Mike Reilly acknowledged that yes, it would be nice if the band made some money from their work but added " ...we do want our music to be out and heard.That's why you write music and play it.A lot of younger people are picking up on our music now because of the single, but it's the kind of music that can appeal to anybody.And dig it, if we can get country play, man, all the truck drivers will know who we are.And then we can get into the truckers' section at the truckstops and have 'em buy us coffee."

It's probably not what the interviewer expected to hear and no doubt Mike had a huge smile when giving that response. Maybe Mike didn't know it at the time, but apparently the truckers were already into PPL as a truckers' magazine named Overdrive gave PPL a plaque naming Two Lane Hghway as their number one song for 1975. And probably somewhere along the line one of them bought him a coffee.

Have a good one,
Tom
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Postby Tom » Sat Nov 04, 2006 9:40 am

Here's one from Craig "Aqualung" Fuller. He was asked how the country rock sound of PPL came about, how they ended up taking that direction.

Craig said the new direction in rock music came from bands that wanted to avoid emulating the popular music of the day. “I think it was a blossoming period in music,â€
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Postby pool_of_tears76 » Mon Nov 13, 2006 8:04 am

Too much Tom :)

Great stuff indeed!
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Postby Tom » Thu Dec 07, 2006 8:04 am

Here's a straight forward one from Vince Gill whose new Cd has gone gold and is making some big noise.

He was asked if he ever thought he would reach the superstar success he attained in country music.

" Heck no ! Not in my wildest dreams. But when I was in High School I never dreamed I'd be in a great band like Pure Prairie League."

Good boy Vince.

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Tom
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Postby Tom » Sun Jul 15, 2007 10:42 am

Here's one from the always energetic drummer, Rick " The Salt Of The Earth" Schell. Rick shares some thoughts on playing with PPL and it's storied history.

"I can’t even begin to describe the feeling you get when singing with a group of guys and it just clicks,â€
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Postby Tom » Wed Nov 21, 2007 10:57 am

The song Kentucky Good Girl has long been considered as one of PPL's red hot live tunes from the early days. It was a George Ed Powell tune, and Mike Reilly once referred to it as one of the songs that defined the essence of PPL.

So why was it never on an LP ? I'm glad you asked. The band never felt what came out in the studio did justice to the song.

According to producer Bob Ringe back in 1975 :

" The second album, I think, shows you the strength of the songwriting. One song of George's that almost went on that we cut is still in the can. Maybe they'll put it on the new album. It's a great song called Kentucky Good Girl. Phew ! Classic ! For some reason we just never got it right. We did it, Goddamn, maybe forty times."

George Ed had quite a few tunes that somehow didn't get on the first two LP's for similar reasons, so many PPL fans were maybe not aware of just how strong a writer George was until after the Two Lane Highway LP and following releases came out. But the band members and fans from back then were well aware of it !

All the best,
Tom Sheridan
"I have seen the future of country music and it's name is Pure Prairie League."
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Postby Tom » Mon Dec 31, 2007 9:54 pm

On December 31, 2007 Pure Prairie League wished all their fans:

" Happy New Year, thanks for the support, see all of you and more in 2008."

All the best,
Tom Sheridan
"I have seen the future of country music and it's name is Pure Prairie League."
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