Question about playing Bustin Out Song on Guitar

Post the chords and lyrics to your favorite PPL songs.

Question about playing Bustin Out Song on Guitar

Postby jpsherfy » Sat Jul 08, 2006 7:00 am

I have been playing along with CD's of my favorite albums for years, every now and then I find one that sounds a bit "off" from the sound of my guitar and Bustin Out is one of those. Can anyone tell me why my guitar sounds a bit off from the music on the CD when I am playing the right cords? I mean they sound close and all, but its like there is a very slight difference. Its almost as if when the album was mastered they changed the speed of the tape a faster or slower by a nano second. Yes, my guitar is in tune. I can pull out other CD's and play along with them and my guitar sounds right on. I noticed that one of the Eagles albums seems that way too.

One other thing I find of interest about Bustin Out is how the guitar seems to be so right up front in the recording. The strings seem to be right there on my ears. I don't know if I can remember another album recorded that way.

Any insight would be appreciated.

joe
jpsherfy
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon Jun 26, 2006 9:46 pm
Location: Austin

Postby LIDog » Sat Jul 08, 2006 9:26 am

Hi Joe,

I don't know if I can help much as to why some records are a little off. It seems likely that the speed was changed in mixing it for release. Could be an accidental thing, but they also might have just liked the way it sounded!

Unfortunately, the only thing we can do is try adjusting our tuning when we're playing along. In the case of Angel, and Call Me Tell Me, as I've mentioned before, I think that the guitars were deliberately tuned down a half step. I just posted those songs again so people can try playing them with a capo, and not have to retune.

But of course, as you pointed out, they might still have to retune, to match the whole record in the first place!

I'm afraid I can't help anybody there!

As for the sound of the guitars, there are so many factors that can affect that, from the guitars, microphones, or pick-ups used, to the mixing itself...

Maybe someone else will jump in here if they have more details about these sessions!

Best,
Dog
LIDog
 
Posts: 241
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 11:47 am
Location: Long Island,NY

Thanks

Postby jpsherfy » Sat Jul 08, 2006 4:01 pm

Thanks for your input......
jpsherfy
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon Jun 26, 2006 9:46 pm
Location: Austin

Postby MartinD28 » Sun Jul 09, 2006 6:09 pm

LIDog wrote:Hi Joe,

I don't know if I can help much as to why some records are a little off. It seems likely that the speed was changed in mixing it for release. Could be an accidental thing, but they also might have just liked the way it sounded!

Unfortunately, the only thing we can do is try adjusting our tuning when we're playing along. In the case of Angel, and Call Me Tell Me, as I've mentioned before, I think that the guitars were deliberately tuned down a half step. I just posted those songs again so people can try playing them with a capo, and not have to retune.

But of course, as you pointed out, they might still have to retune, to match the whole record in the first place!

I'm afraid I can't help anybody there!

As for the sound of the guitars, there are so many factors that can affect that, from the guitars, microphones, or pick-ups used, to the mixing itself...

Maybe someone else will jump in here if they have more details about these sessions!

Best,
Dog


I'd say you've probably got it right. Lot of times the half step tuning is done to make the vocals easier to sing...not sure if that''s the case here or not. In the "old days" when we used to trade concert boots on tape, a lot of times I'd have to adjust tuning to play along. This may have been due to the tape unit that recorded or the tape unit that was dubbed to. These days, it seems a bit more stable or constant due to the high quality gear for recording & dubbing.

Call Me Tell Me and Angel have always been great songs to play and still do today. They were both on my set list when I used to do gigs around town (years ago).
User avatar
MartinD28
 
Posts: 35
Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2005 4:41 pm
Location: Virginia

Postby Dan Williams III » Sun Jul 16, 2006 7:22 am

"PITCH CONTROL" is the solution to CD speed variations. It's a Godsend send for all aspiring musicians frustrated by the inconsistencies found on many recordings. There are several CD players available with this feature, but I suggest that you get one of the trainers such as is here:

http://www.podcastingnews.com/category/CD_Players.htm
http://www.nextag.com/pitch-control-cd- ... earch-html

Just be sure that the unit will specifically change the pitch, not just the tempo. Some of them have the capability to change the tempo without afecting the pitch.

I was working on the Tom Petty song "Mary Jane's Last Dance" and only with pitch control was I able to adjust the song's pitch to allow me to play the harmonica part in tune. Once I adjusted it properly, I copied it to my practice CD and I was in business.
Clutch Cargo prefers spinners.
User avatar
Dan Williams III
 
Posts: 89
Joined: Fri Jun 10, 2005 12:09 pm
Location: Mendham, NJ

Postby jpsherfy » Sat Jul 22, 2006 5:19 am

Never thought about pitch control. I think most turntables had that but I would never think that I'd see a cd player with it.
jpsherfy
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon Jun 26, 2006 9:46 pm
Location: Austin

tunings and albums

Postby prairiedog » Mon Jul 24, 2006 8:37 pm

The post from jpsherfy actually hit the nail on the head. In the old days the tape recording machine had a big knob marked VSO (variable speed oscillator). If a producer thought the song was a hair off on tempo or lacking that certain kick, they'd kick in the VSO. Wouldn't change the pitch, just the tape speed. The new hardware like Antares can correct pitch, tempo, etc. Perfect for new recording hopefuls.
Hope this informs.
Best,
Prairiedog
User avatar
prairiedog
 
Posts: 65
Joined: Mon Mar 21, 2005 1:18 pm
Location: NY


Return to Musician's Corner

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron